Ian

This short film on inclusivity amongst children is so heartwarming. It never feels good to be excluded, even amongst the neurotypical. Differences are everywhere but if they were not given so much emphasis, each individual could be… just… well… individual.

Read more about the film here.

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The Tattooist of Auschwitz

This book… this love story… with all the history behind it.

WWII Fiction really gets me. I will never understand the horrors of those who went through the worst of those times, but books like these give me a glimpse of what the human heart, body and soul can go through even in the toughest of times.

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Hobbies

I chanced upon this article on the New York Times on mediocrity vs excellence, in relation to hobbies – and I love it.

In Praise of Mediocrity

Lost here is the gentle pursuit of a modest competence, the doing of something just because you enjoy it, not because you are good at it. Hobbies, let me remind you, are supposed to be something different from work. But alien values like “the pursuit of excellence” have crept into and corrupted what was once the realm of leisure, leaving little room for the true amateur.

Dyslexie

Why don’t phone makers create a theme in the OS where everything is presented in this wonderful font called Dyslexie?

I can’t imagine how difficult it must be to read when the letters jump or don’t make sense – where it’s hard to locate the next line or recall what the last word you read is.

Having taught for a couple of years, I’ve seen how Dyslexia in students causes them very real stakes – a boy capable of intellectual rigour, being streamed to a stream that doesn’t challenge him enough in his mind, but challenges him thoroughly in his processing of information that comes on worksheet after worksheet.

What a wonderful thing is ‘reading’ was not just ‘reading’ – but more focused on what one does with the information presented – whichever way it is in. Maybe one day, P2 Comprehension will be in audio form – not as an ‘access arrangement’ but as an alternative – it could be a choice before taking the national examinations. And students all get to read on the screens and answer them there – and the student with Dyslexia can just click on the audio button and seamlessly listen to the text.

Read has been transformed and I am one who has benefitted greatly from audiobooks (thank you Libby). I go through a book in 2-5 days – as opposed to how little I read when I was younger (the pivotal years where stakes were high). But it’s not too late.

Oh what audio books could do for those who struggle with reading, one way or another.

Reads

I’ve been reading ebooks and listening to audiobooks intensively in the past few weeks, all thanks to Libby. I’ve gotten through many titles, including:

  • Designing Your life
  • In Order to Live
  • The Kinfolk Home
  • Grit
  • A Pale View of Hills
  • 1Q84
  • Quiet
  • Good Morning, Midnight
  • Northanger Abbey
  • How to Win Friends and Influence People in a Digital Age

Creating insta stories of noteworthy ideas and quotes has become quite a habit and I’ve gotten so much good stuff I just need to share.

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Quiet
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Quiet
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Quiet
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Good Morning, Midnight (I totally thought it was good morning good night for the longest time.)
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Designing Your Life
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How to Win Friends and Influence People in a Digital Age
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In Order to Live

 

Get my hygge on

On our recent trip to Bangkok, I saw a book at Kinokuniya (while Immanuel had the time of his life browsing through countless books, and buying a few) which talked about the Danish notion of happiness.

The author, Meik Wiking, who is the CEO of The Happiness Research Institute wrote in his Litte Book of Hygge, about the concept of hygge (pronounce hoo-ga), something that some Danes think is uniquely Danish. While I’m not too concerned about whether it is unique or not, I sure want it.

He describes it as a ‘hug’, somewhat ‘intimacy’, which is generally ‘cosy’. Quite an abstract concept that many of us feel in various settings. Fireplaces and candles are the epitome of an experience that’s hyggelig. 

As we build our home in this season of our lives, Immanuel and I seek to keep our home like Kanra (Japanese minimalist), but with loads of hyggelig nooks for books and snuggles.

What am I about?

I don’t know yet. I’ve had a few glimpses of what I am about, and a little clearer of what I hope to be about, but the journey ahead is still pretty long. And I need to remind myself that there’s no hurry to be completely sure of what I am about yet.

I love how this appeared in two of the books I’m reading now. Stay the Path, and the one here, The Last Arrow.